Can this cause cancer?

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Might sound like a weird question, but my dad died of pancreatic cancer, and I asked my mom what she thinks caused it, and since he was a mailman he drove a mail truck, and it was flipped over once. I forget how exactly that works be she said something about him being upside down for so long. This concerns me because a friend of mine from school told me they were in a car that flipped over once and I'm hoping nothing bad will happen to them. But this is only a theory, another one she brought up is that his parents smoked a lot, and he inhaled a lot of second-hand smoke, which is more likely, but I just want to make sure my friend will be ok.

Answered by Dale

I have interviewed cancer victims for more than twenty years and have found a trauma event in each person's history.

The three things that disable or restrict your body's ability to dispose of  cancer (mutated) cells  that your immune system will normally attack and destroy are:

Assaults:

  • Carcinogens (chemicals that you are exposed to). These include food additives, pesticides, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, cigarette smoke, combustion fumes and much more.
  • Physical assaults: surgeries, dental surgeries, accidents, military service (PTSD) and such. The difference between a person who has been assaulted and “gets” cancer, or another disease, and the one who does not is how they react to the emotional trauma that happens to those who have been assaulted.
  • Emotional traumas. These can include betrayal,  divorce, robbery, rape, discrimination, bearing a child (especially after 30 years old),being trapped in a vehicle (upside down or not) job loss, the death of a spouse, close family member or a close friend or any event that is traumatic and then replayed at a conscious or other than conscious level, retriggering the emotion.

One person lets go of the emotional charge created at the time of the event, and another (the person who develops cancer) replays the event at a cellular level over and over. The important thing to understand is that releasing the emotion is, for some people, not native to their personality and as such, must be learned and practiced.

The replaying of trauma events causes the same “fight or flight”  physical and chemical response as the original event. The response stops the digestive process and speeds up the body in preparation to run away. When digestion is compromised, a side effect is a reduction of the pancreatic enzymes that are issued to assist in digestion. These enzymes, when your body is performing at a homeostasis level, also circulate in the bloodstream and are one of the components used to dispose of mutant cells.

Learning to release an emotional event is a skill that will serve you for the rest of your life. My favorite sets of tools for releasing are Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), The Release Technique, and The Sedona Method. They each provide all you need to learn and master emotional releasing when you practice and repeat the process. Start by making your list of all the events that you can think of that might be included in the “trauma” category. When you practice working your way through the list you will witness the stress numbers get lower.

In a few weeks, you will come to events on your list that cause you to think “I wonder why I have this on my list?” At this point, you have trained yourself to release. Well done and congratulations. Dale Maxwell, Disease Recovery Coach

 

 

 

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