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What are heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and how are they formed in cooked meats?

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AH, how bad is meat?

Answer from Cancer.gov

Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are chemicals formed when muscle meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, is cooked using high-temperature methods, such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame (1). In laboratory experiments, HCAs and PAHs have been found to be mutagenic—that is, they cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer.

If you feel you must consume the occasional animal protein (one or twice a year). Please cook at low temperature, using water, the best way in my research seems to be sous vide cooking in which you slow cook in a “seal a meal” bag at a low temperature for a long time.

Sousvide (/su??vi?d/; French for “under vacuum”) is a method of cooking in which food is sealed in airtight plastic bags then placed in a water bath or in a temperature-controlled steam environment for longer than normal cooking times (usually 1 to 6 hours, up to 48 or more in some select cases) at an accurately …( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide)

The meat comes out very tender, for some people the visual results seem to be a bit of a disappointment. That burnt on the outside and pink in the middle is what people are trained to expect.

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